Gladys Knight and The O’Jays live at the Mayo Performing Arts Center on August 28th

GladysKnight_OJaysA double bill of classic 70s soul, featuring Gladys Knight (“Midnight Train To Georgia,” “Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me”) and The O’Jays (“Love Train,” “Back Stabbers,” “I Love Music”).

Date- August 28, 2015 @ 8:00 PM.

Location- Mayo Performing Arts Center

For more details Click Here

10 Design strategies for decorating your new Legacy home using artwork and decor

So you just purchased a state-of-the-art Mountain Lakes Legacy home and you don’t know where to begin your decorating process. First off, furniture is important to bring your luxurious condo together but furniture would be nothing without artwork and decor to spruce up and personalize your space. Art and decor go hand in hand; your art will always look better and have greater impact in the space when the decor supports the art. Here are techniques you can use in your decor to support your art and make it even better to ultimately perfect your brand new Legacy home.

Rob Thomas live at the Mayo Performing Arts Center on August 10th

robthomasRob Thomas– Rob Thomas returns to perform chart-topping hits such as “Lonely No More” and “This is How a Heart Breaks,” and Matchbox Twenty hits like “Push,” “3AM,” “If You’re Gone,” and “Bent.” Featuring Special Guests Plain White T’s (“Hey There Delilah,” “Rhythm of Love””).

Date- August 10, 2015 @ 7:30 p.m.

Location- Mayo Performing Arts Center

Utilize the scenic Tourne County Park to stay in shape this summer

tourne-county-parkWhy go to the gym on a beautiful summer day when you could exercise outside? The Legacy of Mountain Lakes is located just 5 minutes away from Tourne County Park. The park features athletic fields, bike trails, lakes, hiking trails and much more where one could enjoy various outdoor activities with a panoramic view to match . Here’s an easy walking workout that will help you get back in shape with a new outdoor exercise regimen while taking advantage of the natural Mountain Lakes terrain.

 

GO ON A HIKE
You can burn 200 calories in 30 minutes.

Navigating over roots and rocks and along winding or hilly paths can help you melt more fat and improve your agility, balance and coordination.

  • First 5 minutes: Walk along a flat trail at a pace that would make it easy for you to carry on a conversation.
  • Next 7 minutes: Stay on even terrain and pick up your pace so you’re breathing more deeply. (You should be able to talk only in short sentences.) Move at a faster clip for the last 2 minutes of this segment. Your breathing should become more labored, and you should be able to say just a few words at a time.
  • Next 10 minutes: Set out on a hilly trail or rugged path. Slow down to navigate uneven terrain. (If all the trails in your vicinity are flat, alternate between brisk and faster paces for 1 minute each.)
  • Next 5 minutes: Return to even terrain and walk at the same pace you used during the 7-minute segment (you should be able to talk only in short sentences).
  • Last 3 minutes: Continue walking on even terrain at a comfortable pace until your breathing is normal and you can carry on a conversation again.

Trail hiking 101:
Avoid getting blisters and other injuries that could interfere with your workouts.

  • Watch where you walk. Keep an eye on the ground, scanning for loose stones, holes, exposed roots and debris. To avoid slipping and falling, try to step on dull-colored dirt rather than slick, sticky mud.
  • Pamper your feet. To keep feet dry and blister-free, wear socks made of a fabric that draws sweat away from the skin (acrylic, for example, or Coolmax). Besides being uncomfortable, damp socks cause friction, which increases the likelihood of blisters.
  • Get the best boots. Wear lightweight hiking boots or trail shoes for ankle support and more grip when you’re walking on uneven terrain.

Source: http://www.allyou.com/diet-fitness/walking-workout-to-lose-weight/page2

Mountain Lakes Manna – Reprinted from HudsonMOD Magazine

GacLeg05By Sue Brisolla

MOUNTAIN LAKES is one of northern New Jersey’s most affluent towns. Because of its elite status, HornRock Properties has chosen it to debut their newest luxury residences. The Legacy of Mountain Lakes is a community of townhomes nestled in the quaint woods of Morris County. These lavish units cater to homebuyers who want a small-town charm while being close to busy city life.

New York City is easily accessible via New Jersey Transit trains and buses, as well as Routes 46, 80 and 280. Mountain Lakes’ school system is top rated in New Jersey. Students’ Advanced Placement participation, SAT scores and graduation rates are all very high. Its proximity to parks, lakes and outdoor facilities makes it a wonderful place to live and raise a family.

“The Legacy of Mountain Lakes is a housing opportunity that doesn’t come around very often in the exclusive Morris County market,” says David Hornblass of HornRock Properties. “It’s a rare chance to purchase an upscale, brand-new townhome that includes an array of modern and contemporary finishes not commonly found in the area’s existing housing inventory.”

The Carriage Series includes the Midvale and the Hillcrest, and the Signature Series consists of the Fernwood and the Briarcliff. Both series boast a multitude of amenities such as hardwood floors and top-of-the-line appliances and feature beautiful stone and stucco exteriors.

The Midvale and Hillcrest feature three full bedrooms, two full and two half bathrooms, one- or two-car garages, designer kitchens, dining and family rooms, patios and master suites.

The Fernwood and the Briarcliff have three full bedrooms, two full and one half bathrooms, two-car garages, designer kitchens, Great Rooms with fireplaces, libraries, walk-out basements, granite countertops and spacious master suites and master baths with Kohler fixtures.

The Legacy offers upscale gourmet cooking amenities, including premium Wolf ranges and ovens. In addition, the homes are sleekly styled and furnished with top-quality finishes. The open-floor plan allows easy entertainment of guests, and the location makes it ideal for enjoying the great outdoors.

“This sought-after neighborhood fulfills all the luxury lifestyle needs of today’s sophisticated homebuyer, with a wide selection of well-designed and exquisitely appointed floor plans and open and airy interior spaces. Of course, homebuyers receive all this in an affluent borough that offers all the attributes of the perfect suburban lifestyle,” says Hornblass.

For more information about the Legacy of Mountain Lakes, please visit www.legacyofmountainlakes.com

Why Mountain Lakes?
High-ranking New Jersey public school system
Near recreation such as the Mountain Lakes Club, Rockaway Valley Country Club and Lakeland Hills YMCA
Close to parks and jogging and biking trails
Just 15 minutes away from historic Morristown
Access to public transportation
Close to restaurants, shops, golf courses and other entertainment
Routes 80, 46 and 287 easily accessible

Billy Idol Live at the Mayo Performing Arts Center, Friday, June 5

BillyIdolv2Billy Idol Coming to Morristown

Classic 80’s rock British bad boy Billy Idol, known for such power pop hits as “Rebel Yell,” “White Wedding,” “Dancing with Myself” and “Eyes Without a Face”, will be performing live Friday, June 5 at 8:00 pm at the Mayo Performing Arts Center, 100 South Street, Morristown NJ.

Billy Idol is one of a few musicians who can step on stage and immediately captivate the audience by his presence. His signature bleached spiked hair, his black leather jacket, and his macho like attitude are all important in creating the atmosphere for his performance. Although his appearance is highly engrossing, his music is what wins the audience’s hearts.

MPAC presents a wide range of entertaining programs in many genres:  classical, jazz, dance, contemporary, theater, family and comedy.  They also offer musical theater and acting classes for children ages 5–18.

 

Meet Nancy Brower, Sales Director at The Legacy

NancyBrowerNancy Brower
Sales Director

Office: (888) 816-6701

Hours: 11am-5pm Sunday; 10am-5pm Mon; 11am-7pm
Thurs; 10am-5pm Fri; 10am-6pm Sat; Closed Tues and Wed

Meet Nancy Brower, Sales Director at The Legacy. As bright as
she is beautiful, Nancy can deliver the perfect Legacy model
you’re looking for at the best possible price.

Come in and say hello.

www.legacyofmountainlakes.com

Morristown Restaurant Week April 27 – May 3

14808534-mmmainMore than 50 local restaurants will be offering deals and specials during Morristown Partnership’s annual Morristown Restaurant Week. From Monday, April 27 – Sunday, May 3, 51 participating restaurants in town will offer prix fixe menus for lunch and dinner, along with special promotions and other drink discounts, as part of the fifth-annual event. More than 40 types of food are expected to be served throughout town. Restaurant-goers can also take advantage of making reservations online at OpenTable.com for the 18 Morristown restaurants that are signed up on the website. For a full list of participating restaurants, visit morristownrestaurantweek.com or call the Morristown Partnership at 973-455-1133.

Special kitchen incentive offered at Legacy of Mountain Lakes

Legacy of Mountain Lakes is offering a limited-time ‘gourmet cooking’ incentive which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven. Three-bedroom homes in Morris County are priced from $799,900.

Legacy of Mountain Lakes is offering a limited-time ‘gourmet cooking’ incentive which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven. Three-bedroom homes in Morris County are priced from $799,900.

HornRock Properties has rolled out a special spring “gourmet cooking” incentive at Legacy of Mountain Lakes as the upscale Morris County townhome community nears the complete sell-out of its initial housing phase.

The limited-time incentive celebrates how quickly Legacy has evolved from a picturesque wooded property into a thriving community full of happy residents. More than 60 percent of the residences in the first housing release have been sold and most of those buyers have already moved in. The Mountain Lakes lifestyle is a strong draw, and the “gourmet cooking” incentive, which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven to the already well-equipped kitchens, sweetens the deal. The Wolf range/oven joins an extensive list of upscale designer selections that come included in the purchase price at Legacy.

“Legacy’s sales success can be largely attributed to the level of luxury that comes with our designer standard features package,” said Maurice Hornblass, a principal of HornRock Properties. “We decided to take this level of luxury even further by including one of our most desired customization options free of charge. However, this incentive will only be offered on the limited inventory of homes in our current phase so those buyers wishing to add value to their purchase should act quickly.”

Two distinct housing “collections” — the Signature and Carriage Series — are offered at Legacy of Mountain Lakes, each with a professionally decorated model home.

Homes in the community’s Signature Series feature three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths and either 2,829 or 2,853 square feet of luxury living space, priced from $799,900.

Homes in the Carriage Series are offered in two designs, the “Midvale” and the “Hillcrest,” both of which offer three-bedroom layouts with two full baths, two half baths and one- or two-car garages. These three-story townhomes range from 2,162 to 2,236 finished square feet and are priced from $589,900. The Carriage Series homes were designed with the needs of today’s young suburban homebuyer in mind, as they feature expansive living spaces, exquisite finishes and a modern, “open concept” layout.

Legacy of Mountain Lakes has proven to have broad appeal to a wide range of homebuyers. Buyers to date have cited the community’s visually attractive location, desirable quality-of-life and top-notch public school system as motivating factors.

“Many buyers who have their heart set on Mountain Lakes are pleasantly surprised to learn about the multiple townhome designs we offer and just how much quality, space and comfort they are receiving for their home-buying dollar,” said David Hornblass, another HornRock principal. “The combination of a beautiful new construction townhome and this classic American small town setting is proving to be a tremendous draw. The community is buzzing with activity every day as our residents enjoy everything this tremendous location offers.”

Situated at the intersection of Morris Avenue and Fanny Road, Legacy of Mountain Lakes offers a desirable Morris County location characterized by winding country roads, bucolic lakes and heavily wooded terrain. With its attractive setting and close proximity to convenient transportation, the community offers a prestigious address. The community features easy access to routes 46, 287 and 80, putting residents just minutes from world-class shopping, entertainment and major business centers. The quaint but sophisticated colonial town center of Morristown with top-rated restaurants, shopping and nightlife is a 10-minute drive away.

Mountain Lakes is home to several parks and nine lakes, making it ideal for outdoor recreation, all right in the heart of one of northern New Jersey’s most picturesque settings.

Prospective homebuyers are invited to tour of the model homes and learn more about The Legacy of Mountain Lakes. For more information, contact the sales office at 973-265-0899 or visit www.legacyofmountainlakes.com

Did You Know? Here’s A Little History on Mountain Lakes.

In 1910, Mountain Lakes was a rural woodland owned by a few families with names such as Righter, Grimes, Ball and Van Duyne.  In the space of ten years, however, the entire face of Mountain Lakes changed from a wilderness of Dutch and English properties to a planned suburban community of large stucco houses now affectionately known as “Lakers.” During this single decade, the natural and architectural character of Mountain Lakes was developed.  Since then, despite superficial changes, the original design imagined by the local engineer, Lewis Van Duyne, and executed primarily by developer, Herbert J. Hapgood, remains intact.
Today, some 90 years later, Mountain Lakes is still prospering, essentially intact, whereas other planned communities have lost their identities to intrusive development.  Mountain Lakes ability to preserve its original design and character has been cited by professional planners as unique among American communities.
Hapgood
Herbert J. Hapgood

Fifteen years after Lewis Van Duyne surveyed the site for the nearby Boonton Reservoir, his practiced eye conceived a design for the development of the property adjacent to the city-bound branch of the Lackawanna Railroad.  The site was a large tract of pristine land, one of rolling hills, woods, swamps and boulders.  With the vague idea in mind of clearing the land and developing the site, he contacted developer and entrepreneur, Herbert J. Hapgood.
Hapgood, together with his landscape engineer, Arthur T. Holton, had a vision.  He wanted to build homes in a popular, marketable mode.  So he set out to build a gracious planned community to provide future homeowners with comfortable family-oriented homes.
As the first houses were built, residents ventured out from New York to escape the city heat.  The first family, the Lawrence W. Luellens, moved into 46 Dartmouth Road on March 17, 1911.  By the end of June, some fifty families had taken up residence.  After the railroad station was completed in November of 1912, commuters were ready to take advantage of a direct train line to New York.  By the end of 1912, two hundred Hapgood homes were sold and occupied.  By 1923, approximately six hundred stucco houses were built to meet the overwhelming demand.
Hapgood was particularly influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, at the height of its popularity in 1910 when he started building.  He took many features of Gustav Stickley’s Craftsman architecture and philosophy and adapted them to his own designs.  His houses were solid and boxy in appearance.  They were large yet non-ostentatious homes with variations of colonial or neo-classical detail.  All showed a clear relationship to the natural environment and promoted outdoor living.  They were made to fit into the landscape, located on natural rather than graded terrain.  Narrow roads were curved to fit the contours of the land.  Local boulderstone was used extensively.  The houses were designed to appeal to upper middle-class people who wanted to raise their families in a wholesome country environment filled with recreational opportunities and neighbors who would share their values.
An early advertisement features three distinct types of houses which were built on lots near the banks of Wildwood and Mountain Lakes, these lakes having been created for the residential park by three earthen dams.  Hapgood named them the Manor House, the Semi-Bungalow and the Swiss Chalet.  These styles were actually adaptations of the Foursquare House common in American towns in the early part of the twentieth century.  In an article entitled, “The American Foursquare,” in The Old House Journal (February 1982), the architectural historian, Renee Kahn, defines the Foursquare as a two story house with “a square boxlike shape, and a low hipped roof with broad overhanging eaves.  The exterior is unadorned, relying for impact on its shape and proportion.  There is usually a porch extending the full width of the front elevation.  Most often, there is a dormer in the roof facing front; sometimes there will also be dormers on the two side planes of the roof.  Occasionally there will be a bay window or other architectural feature that breaks up the absolute flatness of the sides.”
The Hapgood model homes were early forerunners of the modern development, but each house was modified to suit individual tastes.  To the basic styles of these houses, Hapgood added colonial and craftsman features.  He reversed floor plans, and inter- changed architectural details.
The choice of materials used in the Lakers reflected both local availability and the fashion of the times.  The fieldstone of the chimneys, walls and foundations was deposited regionally by the Wisconsin glacier ten thousand years ago.  Chestnut paneling, ceiling cross beams and oak flooring were cut from trees by Hapgood at local sawmills using the timber cleared from the construction sites.  Around 1910, builders began to show increased interest in stucco.  Renee Kahn states, “Although its initial cost was slightly more than wood, it required little or no maintenance, and could be tinted delicate pastel colors when wet …  A soft beige/brown appears to have originally been the most popular color.”
As is generally the case in planned communities, most of the trees and plants were removed for ease of construction.  Trees and bushes which have sprung up since reflect the natural, informal landscaping that was prevalent at the time.  The mountain laurel and rhododendron, for example, are specifically adaptive to our acid soil.  Other decorative outdoor structures consisted of garden trellises, pergolas, gazebos, boathouses and tennis courts designed to enhance the enjoyment of the outdoors.
An unusual feature of the development was that so many houses, nearly 500 of them, were built by one developer.  That so many of them have survived is also unusual.  In fact, the 454 original houses still remaining is one of the largest collections of Craftsman-influenced houses in the United States.
The original design layout and the “Hapgoods” established the community as an ideal garden suburb and inspired subsequent development.  The later homes were, for the most part, smaller and of various styles, but the original standards of quality in materials and craftsmanship were continued.  Although there is no code in the Borough to control style of architecture, there exists nevertheless a certain homogeneity within the community derived in large part from the prominence of the old stucco Hapgood homes and the dominance of colonial styles among newer buildings.
In 1923, when Hapgood’s enterprise failed, the Belhall Company was formed to take control of undeveloped land and steps were taken for Mountain Lakes to become a separate municipality.  It is significant that, at this time, a committee was formed to draw up possible boundaries for the new Borough.  So it was, that only a little more than a decade after the first construction, boundaries were drawn that went to the Denville border on the west and to Intervale Road on the east, explicitly “in order to permit continuity in development.” This was recognition of the idea that Hapgood’s vision extended not only to the properties he owned but to others that were contiguous.
Also in the 1920’s, well after the Hapgood development was established, the Arthur D. Crane Company bought land from the St. Francis Health Resort and created the Lake Arrowhead development with its own distinctive type of architecture and design upon the land.
Immediately after World War II, a major new development occurred on a large, relatively flat tract of land between the railroad and Intervale Road.  There the Fox Development Company erected some 67 smaller homes that filled an important demand for housing for returning veterans and their young families.
Two other events of major importance to the Borough were its acquisition in 1938 (toward the end of the Depression) of titles to most of the prime undeveloped building lots remaining in the Borough and, in 1952, the purchase of 250 acres of woodland around Crystal and Birchwood Lakes and up to the Tourne.  Both of these acquisitions gave Mountain Lakes the opportunity to control its own destiny, to avert the intrusive over-development that destroyed so many other planned communities, and to maintain its unique character.
Today, the grand gardens have been simplified, houses have been renovated and the servants are gone.  Still, the essential character of the Lakers in their environment remains.  The rustic suburb of Mountain Lakes has maintained its unique character, environment and sense of place created in the two decades following its founding, fulfilling Hapgood’s vision of an ideal community.  This town’s ability to regulate its growth and thereby control its destiny, cited as unique by Mel Scott in American City Planning Since 1890, is carried on today with renewed dedication to its original ideals.