Earth from Space at the Morris Museum

20150354f725996f46cThe Earth From A Unique Perspective

See our amazing planet from the perspective of orbiting satellites. This exhibit presents large color reproductions of images captured by high-tech satellites circling the earth, recording rare views of events such as dust storms, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and hurricanes. The exhibit runs now through August 16, 2015. Morris Museum, 6 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown NJ. Museum hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11 am-5 pm and Sunday 12 pm-5 pm.

The Morris Museum is Morris County’s epicenter of art, science, culture, and history. Located in the Twin Oaks mansion in historic Morristown, the museum boasts a permanent collection of more than 40,000 objects ranging from rocks and minerals to fine and decorative arts, model railroad and dinosaur exhibitions, as well as one of the country’s largest collections of mechanical musical instruments and automata. It is also the home of the Bickford Theatre, which presents a variety of plays, concerts, and other performances throughout the year.

Art, science, theatre, history – it’s all here and close to home. You’ll be surprised by all there is to do and see.

 

Special kitchen incentive offered at Legacy of Mountain Lakes

Legacy of Mountain Lakes is offering a limited-time ‘gourmet cooking’ incentive which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven. Three-bedroom homes in Morris County are priced from $799,900.

Legacy of Mountain Lakes is offering a limited-time ‘gourmet cooking’ incentive which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven. Three-bedroom homes in Morris County are priced from $799,900.

HornRock Properties has rolled out a special spring “gourmet cooking” incentive at Legacy of Mountain Lakes as the upscale Morris County townhome community nears the complete sell-out of its initial housing phase.

The limited-time incentive celebrates how quickly Legacy has evolved from a picturesque wooded property into a thriving community full of happy residents. More than 60 percent of the residences in the first housing release have been sold and most of those buyers have already moved in. The Mountain Lakes lifestyle is a strong draw, and the “gourmet cooking” incentive, which is highlighted by the addition of a top-of-the-line Wolf range/oven to the already well-equipped kitchens, sweetens the deal. The Wolf range/oven joins an extensive list of upscale designer selections that come included in the purchase price at Legacy.

“Legacy’s sales success can be largely attributed to the level of luxury that comes with our designer standard features package,” said Maurice Hornblass, a principal of HornRock Properties. “We decided to take this level of luxury even further by including one of our most desired customization options free of charge. However, this incentive will only be offered on the limited inventory of homes in our current phase so those buyers wishing to add value to their purchase should act quickly.”

Two distinct housing “collections” — the Signature and Carriage Series — are offered at Legacy of Mountain Lakes, each with a professionally decorated model home.

Homes in the community’s Signature Series feature three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths and either 2,829 or 2,853 square feet of luxury living space, priced from $799,900.

Homes in the Carriage Series are offered in two designs, the “Midvale” and the “Hillcrest,” both of which offer three-bedroom layouts with two full baths, two half baths and one- or two-car garages. These three-story townhomes range from 2,162 to 2,236 finished square feet and are priced from $589,900. The Carriage Series homes were designed with the needs of today’s young suburban homebuyer in mind, as they feature expansive living spaces, exquisite finishes and a modern, “open concept” layout.

Legacy of Mountain Lakes has proven to have broad appeal to a wide range of homebuyers. Buyers to date have cited the community’s visually attractive location, desirable quality-of-life and top-notch public school system as motivating factors.

“Many buyers who have their heart set on Mountain Lakes are pleasantly surprised to learn about the multiple townhome designs we offer and just how much quality, space and comfort they are receiving for their home-buying dollar,” said David Hornblass, another HornRock principal. “The combination of a beautiful new construction townhome and this classic American small town setting is proving to be a tremendous draw. The community is buzzing with activity every day as our residents enjoy everything this tremendous location offers.”

Situated at the intersection of Morris Avenue and Fanny Road, Legacy of Mountain Lakes offers a desirable Morris County location characterized by winding country roads, bucolic lakes and heavily wooded terrain. With its attractive setting and close proximity to convenient transportation, the community offers a prestigious address. The community features easy access to routes 46, 287 and 80, putting residents just minutes from world-class shopping, entertainment and major business centers. The quaint but sophisticated colonial town center of Morristown with top-rated restaurants, shopping and nightlife is a 10-minute drive away.

Mountain Lakes is home to several parks and nine lakes, making it ideal for outdoor recreation, all right in the heart of one of northern New Jersey’s most picturesque settings.

Prospective homebuyers are invited to tour of the model homes and learn more about The Legacy of Mountain Lakes. For more information, contact the sales office at 973-265-0899 or visit www.legacyofmountainlakes.com

Did You Know? Here’s A Little History on Mountain Lakes.

In 1910, Mountain Lakes was a rural woodland owned by a few families with names such as Righter, Grimes, Ball and Van Duyne.  In the space of ten years, however, the entire face of Mountain Lakes changed from a wilderness of Dutch and English properties to a planned suburban community of large stucco houses now affectionately known as “Lakers.” During this single decade, the natural and architectural character of Mountain Lakes was developed.  Since then, despite superficial changes, the original design imagined by the local engineer, Lewis Van Duyne, and executed primarily by developer, Herbert J. Hapgood, remains intact.
Today, some 90 years later, Mountain Lakes is still prospering, essentially intact, whereas other planned communities have lost their identities to intrusive development.  Mountain Lakes ability to preserve its original design and character has been cited by professional planners as unique among American communities.
Hapgood
Herbert J. Hapgood

Fifteen years after Lewis Van Duyne surveyed the site for the nearby Boonton Reservoir, his practiced eye conceived a design for the development of the property adjacent to the city-bound branch of the Lackawanna Railroad.  The site was a large tract of pristine land, one of rolling hills, woods, swamps and boulders.  With the vague idea in mind of clearing the land and developing the site, he contacted developer and entrepreneur, Herbert J. Hapgood.
Hapgood, together with his landscape engineer, Arthur T. Holton, had a vision.  He wanted to build homes in a popular, marketable mode.  So he set out to build a gracious planned community to provide future homeowners with comfortable family-oriented homes.
As the first houses were built, residents ventured out from New York to escape the city heat.  The first family, the Lawrence W. Luellens, moved into 46 Dartmouth Road on March 17, 1911.  By the end of June, some fifty families had taken up residence.  After the railroad station was completed in November of 1912, commuters were ready to take advantage of a direct train line to New York.  By the end of 1912, two hundred Hapgood homes were sold and occupied.  By 1923, approximately six hundred stucco houses were built to meet the overwhelming demand.
Hapgood was particularly influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, at the height of its popularity in 1910 when he started building.  He took many features of Gustav Stickley’s Craftsman architecture and philosophy and adapted them to his own designs.  His houses were solid and boxy in appearance.  They were large yet non-ostentatious homes with variations of colonial or neo-classical detail.  All showed a clear relationship to the natural environment and promoted outdoor living.  They were made to fit into the landscape, located on natural rather than graded terrain.  Narrow roads were curved to fit the contours of the land.  Local boulderstone was used extensively.  The houses were designed to appeal to upper middle-class people who wanted to raise their families in a wholesome country environment filled with recreational opportunities and neighbors who would share their values.
An early advertisement features three distinct types of houses which were built on lots near the banks of Wildwood and Mountain Lakes, these lakes having been created for the residential park by three earthen dams.  Hapgood named them the Manor House, the Semi-Bungalow and the Swiss Chalet.  These styles were actually adaptations of the Foursquare House common in American towns in the early part of the twentieth century.  In an article entitled, “The American Foursquare,” in The Old House Journal (February 1982), the architectural historian, Renee Kahn, defines the Foursquare as a two story house with “a square boxlike shape, and a low hipped roof with broad overhanging eaves.  The exterior is unadorned, relying for impact on its shape and proportion.  There is usually a porch extending the full width of the front elevation.  Most often, there is a dormer in the roof facing front; sometimes there will also be dormers on the two side planes of the roof.  Occasionally there will be a bay window or other architectural feature that breaks up the absolute flatness of the sides.”
The Hapgood model homes were early forerunners of the modern development, but each house was modified to suit individual tastes.  To the basic styles of these houses, Hapgood added colonial and craftsman features.  He reversed floor plans, and inter- changed architectural details.
The choice of materials used in the Lakers reflected both local availability and the fashion of the times.  The fieldstone of the chimneys, walls and foundations was deposited regionally by the Wisconsin glacier ten thousand years ago.  Chestnut paneling, ceiling cross beams and oak flooring were cut from trees by Hapgood at local sawmills using the timber cleared from the construction sites.  Around 1910, builders began to show increased interest in stucco.  Renee Kahn states, “Although its initial cost was slightly more than wood, it required little or no maintenance, and could be tinted delicate pastel colors when wet …  A soft beige/brown appears to have originally been the most popular color.”
As is generally the case in planned communities, most of the trees and plants were removed for ease of construction.  Trees and bushes which have sprung up since reflect the natural, informal landscaping that was prevalent at the time.  The mountain laurel and rhododendron, for example, are specifically adaptive to our acid soil.  Other decorative outdoor structures consisted of garden trellises, pergolas, gazebos, boathouses and tennis courts designed to enhance the enjoyment of the outdoors.
An unusual feature of the development was that so many houses, nearly 500 of them, were built by one developer.  That so many of them have survived is also unusual.  In fact, the 454 original houses still remaining is one of the largest collections of Craftsman-influenced houses in the United States.
The original design layout and the “Hapgoods” established the community as an ideal garden suburb and inspired subsequent development.  The later homes were, for the most part, smaller and of various styles, but the original standards of quality in materials and craftsmanship were continued.  Although there is no code in the Borough to control style of architecture, there exists nevertheless a certain homogeneity within the community derived in large part from the prominence of the old stucco Hapgood homes and the dominance of colonial styles among newer buildings.
In 1923, when Hapgood’s enterprise failed, the Belhall Company was formed to take control of undeveloped land and steps were taken for Mountain Lakes to become a separate municipality.  It is significant that, at this time, a committee was formed to draw up possible boundaries for the new Borough.  So it was, that only a little more than a decade after the first construction, boundaries were drawn that went to the Denville border on the west and to Intervale Road on the east, explicitly “in order to permit continuity in development.” This was recognition of the idea that Hapgood’s vision extended not only to the properties he owned but to others that were contiguous.
Also in the 1920’s, well after the Hapgood development was established, the Arthur D. Crane Company bought land from the St. Francis Health Resort and created the Lake Arrowhead development with its own distinctive type of architecture and design upon the land.
Immediately after World War II, a major new development occurred on a large, relatively flat tract of land between the railroad and Intervale Road.  There the Fox Development Company erected some 67 smaller homes that filled an important demand for housing for returning veterans and their young families.
Two other events of major importance to the Borough were its acquisition in 1938 (toward the end of the Depression) of titles to most of the prime undeveloped building lots remaining in the Borough and, in 1952, the purchase of 250 acres of woodland around Crystal and Birchwood Lakes and up to the Tourne.  Both of these acquisitions gave Mountain Lakes the opportunity to control its own destiny, to avert the intrusive over-development that destroyed so many other planned communities, and to maintain its unique character.
Today, the grand gardens have been simplified, houses have been renovated and the servants are gone.  Still, the essential character of the Lakers in their environment remains.  The rustic suburb of Mountain Lakes has maintained its unique character, environment and sense of place created in the two decades following its founding, fulfilling Hapgood’s vision of an ideal community.  This town’s ability to regulate its growth and thereby control its destiny, cited as unique by Mel Scott in American City Planning Since 1890, is carried on today with renewed dedication to its original ideals.

HornRock Properties’ New Home Communities Offer New Suburban Lifestyle in the New Year

Great Room & Kitchen DSC_0061City sidewalks may be dressed in Holiday style, but homebuyers in large numbers are deciding it’s the perfect time to escape the hustle-and-bustle of urban living and retreat to suburban settings throughout the New York metropolitan area.

Now more than ever, young families are finding tremendous opportunities to live in new home communities that offer great seasonal deals and feature homes with dramatic living spaces, locations with award-winning school systems and commuter-friendly access and the peace and tranquility of scenic natural beauty. Such is the case at Legacy of Mountain Lakes and The Rise at HighPointe, two signature residential developments from HornRock Properties.

Legacy at Mountain Lakes in Morris County, N.J. has become a popular destination for young buyers migrating to the suburbs for comfortable and luxurious homes, open space and good schools. The collection of just 39 three-bedroom townhomes is situated in one of New Jersey’s most prominent residential settings with a top-notch public school system that’s continually cited by renowned publications for its excellence.

“Legacy combines all the attributes that have traditionally drawn City residents to the suburbs, all in one community,” says Maurice Hornblass, a principal of HornRock Properties.

Two separate housing collections are offered at The Legacy, each with host of upscale design elements. The “Carriage Home Series” will feature townhomes ranging from 2,162 to 2,236 finished square-feet of luxury space and boasting 2 ½ baths and one- or two-car garages. Two layouts – the Midvale and Hillcrest – are highlighted in the “Carriage Homes” priced from $579,900.

Residences in the community’s “Signature Home Series” feature three bedrooms, 2 ½ baths and either 2,829 or 2,853 square feet of luxury living space, priced from $799,900.

“There are very few new construction townhomes in Morris County being offered with this level of luxury,” Maurice adds. “Legacy provides the unique scenario of living in an expansive, upscale home with modern amenities and features, yet still enjoying the advantages of a care-free lifestyle where many daily tasks such as landscaping and snow removal are performed. It’s an attractive situation for those moving from high-rise apartments or smaller condominium in urban areas.”

Legacy also offers a convenient location just off Route 287 with easy access to Routes 46 and 80, bringing the business and entertainment centers of New York City and northern New Jersey within quick reach.

Similar reasons are drawing homebuyers to The Rise at HighPointe, a collection of 31 single-family homes rising on a hilltop site in the Woodbury Junction community in Orange County, N.Y.’s Central Valley, NY.

“A high percentage of homeowners at HighPointe are young families who want the ‘American Dream’ lifestyle, but are priced out of New York City’s immediate suburbs,” says David Hornblass, another HornRock principal. “They are turning to Orange County, N.Y. and The Rise at HighPointe where they can find spacious single-family homes surrounded by majestic beauty and located in an established, inviting neighborhood setting. With pricing significantly less than Bergen, Westchester or Rockland Counties, this community provides an opportunity to realize the dream of homeownership well within their budget.”

Priced from $439,000, homes at The Rise include 2,040 to over 3,400 square feet of living space and an open layout on the first floor, with one model offering a first-floor master-bedroom suite, all on property lots of ¾ of an acre and larger. Many high-end features that are upgrades in other communities are standard in the homes at The Rise. Upgrades for features such as custom faucets, lighting, bonus rooms, flooring and three-car garages are also available. Homes are available in five different designs and with three distinct architectural styles: Traditional, Farmhouse (with great front porches) and the extremely popular Arts & Crafts.

The community is just minutes from The New York Thruway/Route 87, Route 17 and several public transportation options, and also just a short walk away from the town’s award-winning schools. The town of Woodbury’s “Woodbury Rec” program provides swimming, boating, day camps, fishing, sports fields, roller hockey and other programs for children of all ages. Residents of The Rise will also enjoy such future resort-inspired amenities as a swimming pool and clubhouse.

For additional information on Legacy of Mountain Lakes please contact the sales office at 973-265-0899 or visit http://www.legacyofmountainlakes.com. For more information on The Rise at HighPointe or to arrange a tour, please call (800) 689-3320 or visit http://www.HighPointeWoodbury.com.

 

How to Have a Stress-Free Thanksgiving

iStock_000041911150MediumThanksgiving is arguably the biggest meal of the year.

It is a time when friends and family come together to share food and enjoy one another.  But there is usually a lot of stress that goes into preparing for the Thanksgiving meal.  The key to a stress-free holiday is advance planning.  Here are a few tips that will keep your stress levels in check:

— Make a holiday meal plan.  Write out the dishes you have in mind and the names of the guests you are expecting.  Be sure and allow for an uninvited guest or two.  Remember, part of what people look forward to on Thanksgiving is leftovers for days to come.

— Start shopping early.  Grocery stores usually begin running holiday sales on turkeys, hams, and dessert items in late October and early November so there is no reason not to take advantage of those pre-holiday specials.  Remember, most people wait until a few days before the holiday to shop.

— Cook ahead.  Many dishes can be made, at least in part, ahead of time.  Casseroles can assembled and frozen.  Pie crusts and bread dough can be prepared weeks before the big day and frozen.  You can even mix all but the wet ingredients in cake and muffin mixes before holiday festivities begin.  Doing what you can far in advance of Thanksgiving will be a real stress-reliever – not to mention a time-saver.

— Plan a buffet-style meal.  Serving a meal buffet-style eliminates the need for one person to be responsible for serving a large group.  It also eliminates the need to set a table to perfection.  Just stack up some plates and lay out some silverware and let everybody get their own plate.

— Make it potluck.  Gone are the days when just a few good cooks carry the burden of all the holiday cooking.  There’s nothing wrong with requesting that everybody pitch in.  Call your guests ahead of time and ask them to bring appetizers, cranberry sauce, sweet potato casserole, pumpkin pie, or paper products.

Thanksgiving is a holiday that should be spent being thankful for blessings and spending quality time with family and friends.  It shouldn’t be a time of stress and anxiety.  Follow these tips for an unforgettable and stress-free Thanksgiving meal.

Michael McDonald Coming to Mayo Performing Arts Center December 02

MichaelMcDonaldGood news for Mountain Lakes residents: Legendary music artist Michael McDonald is coming to Morris County!

With his husky, soulful baritone, Michael McDonald became one of the most distinctive and popular vocalists to emerge from the laid-back California pop/rock scene of the late ’70s. McDonald found the middle ground between blue-eyed soul and smooth soft rock, a sound that made him a star. He initially essayed his signature style with the Doobie Brothers, ushering in the group’s most popular period with hits like “What a Fool Believes” and “Taking It to the Streets.” McDonald disbanded the group in 1982 to pursue a solo career, which was initially quite successful, but by the end of the decade his popularity had faded away, since he was reluctant to work regularly and hesitant to update his sound to suit shifting popular tastes.
After singing backup on several Steely Dan albums in the mid-’70s, Michael McDonald joined the Doobie Brothers in 1977. He was largely responsible for moving the group away from boogie rock and toward polished, jazzy blue-eyed soul. Prior to the Doobies’ farewell tour in 1982, he sang harmony on several hit singles, including tracks by Donna Summer, Toto, Kenny Loggins, and Christopher Cross. As it turned out, McDonald’s solo work was a cross between the Doobie Brothers’ white-bread soul and Cross’ adult contemporary ballads.
McDonald released his solo debut, If That’s What It Takes, in 1982. The record climbed to number six on the strength of the number four single “I Keep Forgettin’ (Every Time You’re Near),” which also crossed over into the R&B Top Ten. In 1983, he had another Top 20 pop hit (and a Top Ten R&B hit) with his duet with James Ingram, “Yah Mo B There.” McDonald didn’t deliver his second solo album, No Lookin’ Back, until 1985. The record wasn’t as successful as its predecessor, producing only one moderate hit in its title track. He bounced back the following year, when his duet with Patti LaBelle, “On My Own,” shot to number one and “Sweet Freedom,” his theme for the Billy Crystal/Gregory Hines comedy Running Scared, climbed into the Top Ten.

For tickets visit www.mayoarts.org/event/michael-mcdonald

Time Running Out To Receive Fall Savings at The Legacy of Mountain Lakes

Midvale Kitchen_HDR2MOUNTAIN LAKES, N.J. – Time is running out for prospective homebuyers to benefit from a special “Fall Savings Package” at The Legacy of Mountain Lakes, the intimate collection of luxury townhomes in this highly sought after Morris County Borough.

Scheduled to end in the weeks ahead, the tremendous incentives include finished walk-out basements valued at almost $40,000 included in the purchase price of homes in the community’s “Signature Series” and $20,000 in free upgrades and features offered on residences purchased in the “Carriage Series.”

“These Fall savings have quickly captured the attention of homebuyers who want upscale Mountain Lakes living at a value-packed price,” says Maurice Hornblass, a principal of HornRock Properties, developer of The Legacy.

“We’ve had a number of homebuyers who have been moved to purchase in order to receive these limited-time incentives before it’s too late.  Unfortunately, we can’t make these deals available forever and these are the final weeks for those interested to add another level of luxury to their home purchase.”

The limited-time incentives enhance the already exceptional value the community offers through its spacious layouts, upscale appointments and ideal location in one of New Jersey’s top school districts.

Four distinct home designs are available at The Legacy. Homes in the community’s Signature Series feature three bedrooms, 2 ½ baths and either 2,829 or 2,853 square feet of luxury living space, priced from $799,900.

Homes in the Carriage Series are offered in two designs, the “Midvale” and the “Hillcrest”, both of which offer three-bedroom layouts with two full baths, two half baths and one- or two-car garages. These three-story townhomes range from 2,162 to 2,236 finished square-feet and are priced from $579,900. The Carriage Series homes were designed with the needs of today’s young suburban home buyer in mind, as they feature expansive living spaces, exquisite finishes and a modern, three-story layout.

“Many buyers who have their heart set on Mountain Lakes are pleasantly surprised to learn about the multiple townhome designs we offer and just how much quality, space and comfort they are receiving for their home buying dollar,” said David Hornblass, another HornRock principal. “The combination of a beautiful new construction townhome and this classic American small town setting is proving to be a tremendous draw.”

Legacy of Mountain Lakes has proven to have broad appeal to a wide range of home buyers.  Buyers to date have cited the community’s visually stunning location, excellent quality-of-life and top-notch public school system as motivating factors.

Situated at the intersection of Morris Avenue and Fanny Road, Legacy of Mountain Lakes offers a superb Morris County location characterized by winding country roads, bucolic lakes and heavily wooded terrain. With its attractive setting and close proximity to convenient transportation, the community unquestionably offers a prestigious address. The community features easy access to Routes 46, 287 and 80, putting residents just minutes from world class shopping, entertainment and major business centers. The quaint but sophisticated colonial town center of Morristown with top-rated restaurants, shopping and nightlife is about a 10-minute drive away.

Mountain Lakes is home to countless parks and nine lakes, making it ideal for outdoor recreation, all right in the heart of one of northern New Jersey’s most picturesque settings. Golf is abundant in the area, and lake clubs, such as the Mountain Lakes Club, offer a variety of outdoor activities and dining options. The Lakeland Hills YMCA is right down the street from Legacy of Mountain Lakes, offering a pool, gymnasium, child care, summer camps, fitness facilities and more, all within walking distance.

If you wish to arrange a tour of the model homes or learn more about The Legacy of Mountain Lakes please contact the sales office at 973-265-0899 or visit http://www.legacyofmountainlakes.com.

And This Just In From Trulia… Buying IS Cheaper Than Renting…

Nationally, buying is 38% cheaper than renting with a traditional 20% down, 30-year mortgage. Buying is an even better deal with a 15-year mortgage.

Homeownership remains cheaper than renting nationally and in all of the 100 largest metro areas. In fact, buying is 38% cheaper than renting now, compared with 35% cheaper than renting one year ago. Why is the gap widening? Two reasons. First, in the past year, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate has fallen from 4.8% to 4.3%.

Second, rents have risen faster than prices, excluding foreclosures. Together, these trends have made buying even more affordable versus renting than it was last year.

Our Rent Versus Buy model assumes a traditional 30-year fixed rate mortgage with a 20% down payment. But there may be good reasons for financing a home purchase other ways. Consumers tell us that the main obstacle to homeownership is the down payment. For those would-be homeowners – especially first-timers without savings or equity from another home – a low-down-payment mortgage might be the only option. For others, paying all cash might give them the deciding advantage over other bidders on a house.

(From Trulia Trends 10/15/14)

Enter our Legacy Photo Contest for a Chance to Win a $1,000 College Scholarship for your Child.

Does your child want be an Astronaut? A Dancer? Or a Professional Athlete, perhaps? What Will Your Legacy be? Enter The Legacy of Mountain Lakes Facebook Photo Contest and you can WIN a $1,000 College Scholarship and other fine prizes. For details and rules  ENTER HERE from your desktop computer: http://on.fb.me/1ngxqt1

And don’t forget to Vote….FB-adCheck back here for updates.

The Lakeland Youth Symphony Orchestra in Morris County, New Jersey provides musical education and performance opportunities for K – 12 students.

Since 1957 the Lakeland Youth Symphony has provided musical education and performance opportunities for young musicians in Northern New Jersey. The organization is now registering children ages 5-9 for their beginner Enhanced Suzuki violin lessons. String instrumentalists (violin, viola, cello, bass, and harp players) of all ages can enroll today in one of the four orchestras LYS offers.

The Lakeland Youth Symphony is a not-for-profit organization that begins its 2014-2015 season in September, at Mountain Lakes High School, 96 Powerville Road, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey. Funding is provided through tuition, private donations and fund-raising activities, as well as a grant from Morris Arts through the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/ Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Visit their website for more information: www.lakelandyouthsymphony.org or email info@lakelandyouthsymphony.org or call (973) 402-6010.
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